Special memories made in London Town

It was extremely hard to say goodbye to our son Ben and daughter-in-law Sarah (and indeed all our family and friends in Australia) when we left Brisbane. Six weeks just didn’t go very far to make up for the long gap of two and a half years since we had seen them last. However, we are planning to go back again in November for longer so that kept us feeling a little less devastated!

It was extremely hard to say goodbye to our son Ben and daughter-in-law Sarah

The queues to go through security at Brisbane airport were absolutely massive and we were really thankful that we had left plenty of time to get airside.

The queues to go through security
at Brisbane airport were absolutely massive

We flew to Amsterdam via Singapore and Paris and we had a good flights until we reached Paris. We just made it to the gate in time to board our last flight when we discovered there was a long delay due to shocking weather in Amsterdam which apparently had caused havoc at the airport.

Fortunately we were able to let our daughter Hannah (who was meeting us at the airport) know that we would be delayed. We eventually took off and arrived safely an hour later at Schiphol.

Made it to Amsterdam – tulips
everywhere of course!

After an easy passage through customs and passport control (some new machines were being trialled and we happened to walk past at the right time) we had an inordinate wait for our luggage to appear. In fact it didn’t arrive all!

It transpired that our cases had been left behind in Paris – but that was fine by us as we had left clothes at Hannah’s and in fact had all that we needed in our hand luggage anyway. Besides, it made our journey back to Hannah and Pieter’s house via train and metro much easier!

Lovely blossom seen on the way back
from the station

Spring had really sprung in the Netherlands during our stay in Australia – evidenced by the tulips on sale at the airport and the green buds, new leaves and glorious blossom we noticed on our walk back to Hannah and Pieter’s house from the metro station.

Spring had really sprung in the Netherlands

We had a wonderful few days of absolutely overdosing on the beauty of it all.

The last of the daffodils- now it’s tulip time
The local gardens were “blooming” gorgeous
I just love the Weeping Willows

Jonathan left on his own after a few days to go to our boat in Didim Marina, Turkey. There were a few projects that he had to oversee and ensure were completed before our contract at the marina expired and we had to leave to begin the 2022 sailing season.

Time for a new chart plotter
The new chart plotter installed
Supplies for the new “Code Zero” sail
ready and waiting
Jonathan was busy overseeing the installation for our new sail

In the meantime I had planned a quick trip to England. I was very excited to see my family who live there as Covid had prevented me from visitIng since early 2020 except for a fleeting trip in the camper van to reset our visa status just before Christmas 2020. Due to lockdown restrictions on that occasion we had only managed to see my eldest sister Sarah for a quick get together in her garden.

Lovely to see these tulips in a local garden
Sheep enjoying the juicy new grass near Hannah and Pieter’s house

Other than that, my other sister Julia had visited us aboard Sunday twice in Turkey and Sarah and her husband Martin had recently visited us in the Netherlands for a weekend but I hadn’t seen my brother Pat or any of my nieces, nephews or great nieces and great nephews at all since February 2020 when we had a massive family celebration at a big mansion house near Stratford-on-Avon for my Martin’s 80th birthday.

Hannah had arranged her work schedule to allow her to take a few days off, so very early one morning she and I took off from Schiphol Airport bound for Gatwick.

Everything went very smoothly and soon we were happily eating a second breakfast at my sister Julia’s place in Beckenham, a suburb in London’s South East bordering with the beautiful county of Kent.

It was just wonderful to catch up with all the family, especially with my brother Pat who had recently been involved in a life-threatening accident but despite his injuries had made a miraculous recovery.

The Kentish countryside not far from Beckenham

Among other things, he and I caught up on a marvellous walk in the Kentish countryside and saw some lovely sights including glorious bluebells in a small wood.

It’s hard to capture bluebells in a photo
The blue of these pretty flowers is much more intense in “real life””
Bluebell woods on a walk with my brother Pat
Such a delicate flower
More wild flowers!

During our short visit Hannah and I went up to London one day to meet my sister Sarah at the Victoria and Albert Museum. On the way there at Victoria station, we were amazed to see a fabulous 1930s style train with smart Pullman coaches complete with coats of arms emblazoned on the side and smartly dressed staff in crisp white jackets waiting to welcome guests aboard.

Pullman coaches complete with coats of arms emblazoned on the side
Smartly dressed staff in crisp white jackets waiting to welcome guests aboard

Peering in the windows we could see bottles of expensive champagne and cut glass flutes on the linen covered tables with exquisite tea cups and delicate matching plates accompanied by silver cutlery and white linen napkins. All so luxurious!

Linen covered tables with exquisite tea cups and delicate matching plates
Travellers really dressed up for their train ride!

Just at the entrance a group of young women were singing thirties-style songs in three-part harmony. We were very tempted to climb aboard for an “Orient Express” experience! However, we had an important date to get to so we carried on towards South Kensington.

This group was singing thirties-style songs in three-part harmony.

We had a wonderful time catching up at the amazing Victoria and Albert museum and enjoyed a wander through some of the galleries – the highlight being the sumptuous and sparkling jewellery exhibit.

It was warm enough to paddle in the shallow pool at the V and A museum
The sumptuous and
sparkling jewellery exhibit – this coronet belonged to Queen Victoria
There were some really interesting
pieces on display
I wouldn’t mind owning this
A striking spiral of gemstone rings – all from one collector – a Victorian clergyman!

Later on we met my sister’s eldest granddaughter in the fabulous gift shop and went for lunch in the amazing V and A cafe – the first museum cafe ever built!

The entrance to the cafe is under those arches on the building to the left

There are three rooms in this delightful establishment – the Gamble, Poynter and Morris Rooms, opened in 1868 and serving excellent refreshments ever since!

Each room is decorated in a different style – one is covered in pottery tiles decorated with colourful lead glazes and has the atmosphere and pizazz of a richly adorned, dazzling, Parisian cafe.

The Gamble room
Reminiscent of a Parisian cafe

Another of the rooms has fabulous blue and white tiles reminiscent of Delft tiles but painted by female students from the National Art Training School.

The Poynter Room
This room used to serve chops and other grilled meats – this is an ornately decorated cast iron and brass grill, designed by Sir Edward Poynter in 1866.
The blue and white tiles were painted by female art students- a rare commission for a woman in those days!

The third room was designed by William Morris – one of the most famous designers of the Victorian period – early in his career. Painted a deep mossy green, with stained glass windows, this room feels cool and mysterious and is decorated with signs of the zodiac which adds to its mystical ambiance.

The mystical Morris room
Somof the stained glass in the Morris Room

Later we were joined by my brother Pat and returned to the lovely cafe for tea and cake!

The wonderful day ended with some of us meeting my other sister Julia for a meal and then on to a West End Show – the Andrew Lloyd Webber version of Cinderella, a completely new take on the old fairy tale and one with several plot twists! It was such exuberant fun and we all thorough enjoyed the experience.

So good to be back in the West End!
Waiting in anticipation for the curtain to rise

It was so brilliant to see a West End show after such a long time.

It was a really well produced show
The amazing cast takes the curtain call

What special memories were made that day – I will treasure them always!

Togetherness, termites, tractors, temporary tenants and a farewell feast

What a great time we had on our short visit to Australia! We did lots of socialising – catching up with family and friends for wonderful lunches and dinners plus some excellent meals out, going on walks and having coffee dates together and attending book club meetings.

Our grandbirdie Gidget trying to extract honey – usually it comes from a spoon!

A big thank you to everyone for hosting us – we promise to have all of you back to “the doll’s house” (our small town house) when we come back for a longer visit at Christmas.

Bird life of another kind – a beautiful owl we encountered on the road one evening

Between the aftermath of the floods and most of an entire household catching Covid, we didn’t get to see enough of our extended family although we did have a fantastic family picnic day at Ben and Sarah’s new property.

Family picnic day!
We had plenty of camping chairs
to sit on for lunch

Despite there being very little furniture in the new house, as Ben and Sarah were yet to move in properly, we had a lovely shared meal there and later went down to the nearest creek on their property, just a short walk/drive from the house.

Down by the creek
The children loved paddling

There was much splashing and swimming on the part of the children and the dogs but the highlight of the afternoon for the bigger kids was to tumble into the back of Ben’s 4WD to drive back to the house.

We found a water hole which was deep
enough to swim in
Enjoying watching all the splashing
and swimming
The dogs had a great time too
A stick and water – the best combination!
Driving back to the house in the
back of the 4WD

Or maybe the absolute highlight was to be allowed to sit on Ben and Sarah’s tractor and toot the horn endlessly until it “ran out of battery”?!

Sitting on the tractor was a bit of a hit

Just before we arrived in Brisbane we had heard from the agents who were overseeing the rental of our townhouse that termite activity had been found when the tenants moved out.

Inspecting some of the damage

So we had to organise termite treatment and repairs to the affected areas. There was also a big mess left in the garage wall and ceiling (and we later found, the floor upstairs in one of the bedrooms) created by an unreported leaky shower.

We had to organise termite treatment and repairs to the affected areas
There was also a big mess created by an unreported leaky shower

In the meantime, our nephew’s family had been made homeless as their apartment was badly flooded so we offered them the townhouse while they sorted themselves out. Fortunately, they were able to stay with his parents (my brother-in-law and sister-in-law) for a few weeks and then house sit while his parents were away travelling. However, they asked whether their friends who had also been made temporarily homeless, could “camp” in the townhouse for a few weeks, which they did.

As the required repairs were quite extensive it meant some repainting would be needed so we decided to have the whole house done while we were at it. New flooring was also needed downstairs as the old marble floor had some big ugly cracks and stains. So we were busy organising trades people towards the end of our visit.

The floor was stained and had a
massive crack in it

We also decided to pull our remaining possessions out of storage and use our garage to keep them safe.

Why pay for storage when you have a garage?
The removal van arrives to unload
our scant possessions
It all fitted in very nicely
Taking a few bits up to Ben and
Sarah’s new place

In the days leading up to our return to Europe it poured with rain again and we were anxious that there might be more flooding to come. The creeks near Ben and Sarah’s new place did in fact rise but we were still able to get in and out of the property for the remainder of our stay.

It poured with rain again
The causeway was covered but passable
Just before the driveway was pretty soggy!
The sun came out again and all was well
The doggies taking me for a walk
One of the glorious views from
Ben and Sarah’s new place

Although we didn’t spend a night up there, we visited most days and tried to help them with the various jobs they were tackling such as cleaning up the garden around the house, filling holes in the walls left from picture hooks, then touching up the paint and organising food for Ben and Sarah and their friends who amongst other things, helped them with fencing for the duck/dog run.

Working bee to construct an enclosure
for the duckies
And the gate is installed!
Starting to look good!
The completed enclosure
A well deserved drink and paddle at the creek after all the hard work
Another day, another job, cleaning the big shed

The day before we left for the Netherlands Ben and Sarah took delivery of their brand new ride on mower (more of a mini tractor really!) – one well up to the task of keeping their many acres of grass under control.

Mine, all mine! says Sarah who loves mowing!
Newly mowed paddock at the back of the house
Another newly mowed paddock on
the other side!

On our last evening I was thrilled to see the sweet little wallabies munching on the grass at the back of Ben and Sarah’s “old” house. I had only seen them once before at their place – the day we finally got through after the floods had prevented us from doing so for four days. It seemed like a good omen and a really lovely memory of their beautiful home. Next time we visit Australia the place will be well and truly sold.

The backyard at Ben and Sarah’s old house looking glorious
What a fabulous colour!
Two little wallabies come to say “goodbye”
What a lovely memory to leave Brisbane with

That evening Ben and Sarah took us for a really excellent and enjoyable meal at Persone Italian restaurant at 81, North Quay – a brand new building since we were last in Brisbane.

The restaurant had gorgeous views of the Brisbane River and the city skyline and the food and service were both excellent. What a great way to end our flying visit to Australia!

Such a fabulous farewell feast!
Mucking around with Easter Bunnies

Making up for lost time

It was simply wonderful being with our son Ben and his wife Sarah after being separated for two and a half years due to Covid travel restrictions and then being delayed four days longer due to the extreme flooding event along the east coast of Australia.

So good to be together again!

Once we had settled in it was as if we had never been away and we set about making up for lost time.

Drinks in the bar with friends

We had drinks in the bar they had built themselves with some of Ben and Sarah’s best friends; had an online cocktail making (and drinking) session with our daughter Hannah in the Netherlands; met our newest great nephew for the first time and went for some great walks with the granddoggies.

Our cocktail making session
Hannah joined in on-line from the Netherlands
Met this gorgeous boy for the first time
Went for some great walks with the granddoggies

One week after our arrival in Brisbane we drove fifteen minutes from Ben and Sarah’s house to the glorious property that they were in the process of purchasing. Unfortunately the flood waters were still over the road leading to the new place and we had to contain our impatience for another couple of days.

The flooded creek hadn’t receded enough for us to get to the new property

While we waited to see their new home, we organised a one-night trip to Sydney to catch up with dear friends, went to a timber yard to find a good piece of wood for their new mailbox and just enjoyed hanging out with Ben and Sarah who had taken a week off work to spend time with us.

A trip to the timber yard to buy a good piece of wood for the mailbox
The mobile dog wash – can you
see Ozzie inside?!

Finally, nine days after our arrival in Australia, the flooded creeks were passable and we were able to see Ben and Sarah’s new home.

The floodwaters have finally receded and the causeway is visible again
The undergrowth on each side of the creek was badly damaged and muddy
The floods left such a mess in their wake
Last creek crossing before Ben
and Sarah’s property
Who would of thought we were only 50 minutes from the centre of Brisbane?
The first dam and the small shed near the entrance to the property

We were blown away with the beautiful location, the wonderful views, the bubbling creeks (small rivers), the two big dams (man made lakes), the paddocks and the fabulous, spacious house with a spectacular outlook.

Welcome to Ben and Sarah’s new home
Such a beautiful location
The very well equipped kitchen
Taken on the front deck
Bathroom with a view!
The gorgeous living room with windows
on three sides
What a fantastic view!
So many beautiful trees
Down by the creek. The house is just visible at the top of the picture
The dogs love paddling in the creek
All set up for drinks by the big dam
The water looking very brown after all the rain
A very happy couple!
Down by the dam

Jonathan had great fun driving the big yellow tractor and we all loved meeting the large green frog community living around the exterior of the house.

Jonathan loved driving the big yellow tractor!
We all enjoyed meeting the
green tree frog family
Ben giving a green tree frog some moisture
Celebration time!

Now that the contract on the property had been completed Ben and Sarah lost no time getting on with jobs and soon hopped on their ride-on mower to start tidying up the immediate surrounds of the house. They also pulled up some fences around the house so they could increase the space to make a large run for the ducks and to improve the view from the deck.

Ben hitching a ride up to the shed
on the ride-on
The “big” shed up ahead
Pulling up fence posts – with the help
of the yellow tractor!

Meanwhile the timber for the mailbox was cut to size and stained and was soon sitting proudly in the shared laneway leading to the property. A beautiful front gate was commissioned and delivered.

The very smart new mailbox
Admiring the new gate

Ben and Sarah also organised a guy to come in and slash as much of the property as possible over three days. The contractor worked from dawn until 8pm each evening and managed to tame huge tracts of land. He did such an amazing job.

Before the slasher arrived
After the slasher!
The paddock was much larger than
we first thought – hurray for the slasher!
Ben’s 4WD in the newly slashed paddock
Sarah and the dogs explore!

Over the next few days we explored the hundred acres in the 4-WD and marvelled at all the special spots we discovered. What a great time to have arrived in Australia – just as the contract on the new house had completed!

Driving on the newly slashed tracks
We found some beautiful spots
Admiring the view
This was such a glorious place
So wonderful to see this amazing view!

Good things come to those who wait

After being trapped in an airport hotel in Brisbane, Australia, for two days and two nights due to a “rain bomb” event (someone described it as a “sky tsunami“) our beautiful niece was able to come and pick us up on the afternoon of the third day.

Our beautiful niece was able to come and pick us up on the afternoon of the third day.

It had been two and a half years since we had been able to return to Australia so it had been bitterly disappointing to arrive at the airport with no one to greet us and unable to see family and friends but now we were leaving the airport hotel and were on our way!

The water was going down but the road out from our son and daughter-in-law’s
was still impassable

It was wonderful to see our niece’s family in their lovely home and to be making some progress towards our final destination – Ben and Sarah’s (our son and daughter-in-law‘s) home on the other side of town.

Our final destination – Ben and Sarah’s house

By early evening we heard that the main road on the way to Ben and Sarah’s was passable by boat and that there were a couple of young guys who had been ferrying people over the floodwaters in their small vessels.

A couple of young guys had been ferrying people over the floodwaters

As our niece and husband both work from home and have three busy and active children we decided that it would be too much for them to have us to stay the night although we were so grateful for the offer.

Our friends Peter and Cathy live on the other side of the flood waters (in the same road we had lived in) and had very kindly invited us to stay until the flooded road between them and Ben and Sarah’s place was passable.

We had a great time with these guys – our longtime friends Cathy and Peter

We left our luggage at our niece’s house as we didn’t think two big bulging suitcases would be welcomed on a small craft. When we got down to the flooded road we coincidentally bumped into our nephew who for several days had been frantically trying to save his family’s possessions from their flooded apartment near the Brisbane River. He looked haggard and exhausted when we said our “hellos” in the middle of the main road!

His wife and baby son were safely on the other side of the flood waters before a massive load of water was released into the river system from Brisbane‘s main dam.

First time meeting this young man!

A delightful young man called Dan, who had been ferrying people to and fro all day, took our nephew and us across literally on his last crossing of the day.

Hero of the day – Dan the ferryman!

On the other side waiting to whip our nephew back to their place to be reunited with his partner and baby, were his Mum and Dad (my brother in-law and sister -in-law).

In the car on the other side looking back on where we had just crossed the flood waters

It was a quick but sweet reunion with our extended family in Brisbane. Then we were off to the home of our friends Peter and Cathy who we had last seen in Rome in October 2019. We had such a lovely catch up and despite having been cut off from the shops for several days Peter and Cathy cooked up a storm and we had a lovely meal together.

The next day we heard from Ben and Sarah that the water over the road out from their place had receded but it was still closed until it could be safety checked and the mud cleaned off.

The water over the road out from Ben and Sarah’s place had receded but it was still closed until it could be safety checked and
the mud cleaned off

We were impatient to see them but having waited two and a half years to be reunited we didn’t mind waiting a few hours extra.

All clean and ready to cross!

That afternoon, three and a half days after we had landed in Australia we were finally able to hug our son and daughter-in-law. Of course it was a very emotional and a very special moment.

They picked us up in a very smart looking second hand Subaru Forester which they had kindly searched for and bought on our behalf.

Our “new” car

The reason we needed an all-wheel drive was because they were in the process of buying a semi-rural property which can only be reached via an unmade road.

Ben and Sarah’s new place is only reachable via an unmade road

We were very grateful that they had worked so hard to find the perfect car for us at an extremely good price and driven many miles to collect it.

Back at their place we were greeted enthusiastically by our granddoggies and less enthusiastically by our grandbird (unless I was playing Bananagrams!) and met our cheeky frozen-pea-loving grandducks for the first time.

Granddog Lucy
Granddog Ozzy
Grandduckies Affie and Molly
Sarah and Molly love cuddles
Ozzy getting cuddles
Even Gidget wanted attention!
Gidget “helping“ me with Bananagrams
Her spelling isn’t always brilliant

We also saw all the work in the house and garden that Ben and Sarah had undertaken since we had last stayed there in 2019 – including their fantastic bar area under the house.

Ben in the bar
The bar lit up

As I looked out onto their backyard for the first time there were two dear little wallabies enjoying the beautiful green grass. What a lovely welcome!

Two wallabies came to welcome us!

That evening, as we sat in the bar enjoying a drink, Ben and Sarah received a message to say that the house they’d signed a contract for exactly nine months previously – to the day – had completed! Sadly, the vendor had passed away during the process and although his son had power of attorney, the sale could not be completed until probate had been settled.

So much to celebrate!
Happy to be together again!
Propping up the bar
Here’s to being together again!

So two wonderful things happened that day proving the old adage “good things come to those who wait”!

Good things come to those who wait!!

The weather gods say “No”!

We were back in the Netherlands once more and it felt wonderful to be with our daughter and son-in-law again!

Cafés in the Netherlands were open but we still had to show proof of vaccination
and wear a mask when not seated

It was only a short stay this time as finally we were able to return to Australia after an absence of two and half years due to Covid and the Australian Government’s “Fortress Australia” response.

MELBOURNE, Feb 20 (Reuters) – “Australia will welcome international tourists on Monday after nearly two years of sealing its borders, relying on high COVID-19 vaccination rates to live with the pandemic as infections decline.”

There had been tens of thousands of people wishing to return from around the world during 2020 and 2021 but with a mandatory two-week hotel quarantine (paid for by the individuals concerned) and scarcely any flights scheduled, the majority of people were unable to get back. Friends who had tried to purchase flights during Covid had found them blisteringly expensive and they were invariably cancelled.

We were so thankful that at last, plenty of flights were going to Australia and we wouldn’t have to stay locked in a hotel room at vast expense for two weeks on arrival.

Before we left for our long awaited reunion with our son Ben and daughter-in-law Sarah and other family and friends, we had a lovely break in the Netherlands.

A cosy Dutch cafe

Despite the chilly weather the sky was blue most days and best of all, the early spring flowers were in bloom. We went on some lovely walks, had coffee and cake in cute cafes, caught up with Pieter’s parents and enjoyed delicious apple pie cooked by his Mum, and cleaned up the van before “putting her to bed” for a while.

The early spring flowers were in bloom!
We went on some lovely walks
Pieter’s pussy cat eyeing Jonathan’s apple pie
Our camper van Frieda back “in bed”
Spring was everywhere!

We had been there only a few days when a terrific storm let rip causing all kinds of mayhem – sheets of metal ripped off the roof of a nearby football stadium, trees being uprooted, roof tiles being lifted and branches falling on people, cars and houses.

The terrific storm caused all kinds of mayhem

The wind came on quickly and before we could move the sturdy garden furniture the chairs were being tossed around the yard and we had to dash out to secure them safely.

The wind caused the garden chairs to be tossed around the yard
Chairs in the shed to stop them
getting blown away!

A stroll round Pijnacker village the following day displayed the frightening force of the wind.

The wind lifted tiles from this lovely old building just a few metres from
Hannah and Pieter’s place
Fortunately the interior was unharmed
Beautiful shiny Italian coffee machine

At Pieter’s parents commercial greenhouse several windows were blown in and there was shattered glass, bent frames and gaping holes in the roof.

Shattered glass in Pieter’s parent’s greenhouse
The wind caused bent frames and
gaping holes in the roof
What a mess!
Saying hello to one of the horses
at Pieter’s parents

In nearby Delft there were piles of roof tiles and other debris littering the pavement. Wild weather and very frightening for anyone caught outside!

Piles of roof tiles from the high winds
Despite the damage caused by the wind, life goes on in beautiful Delft
Business as usual in Delft!
Love the second hand shops in Delft – clogs anyone?!

Our time in the Netherlands slipped by very quickly and after a farewell meal at the local restaurant it was time to fly off to Brisbane, Australia.

A farewell meal at the all-you-can-eat
sushi place

We were very excited to be on our way at last although we were getting a little apprehensive about what the weather gods were going to throw us next! After deep snow in Cappadocia and cyclonic winds in The Netherlands, what was Australia going to produce weather wise?!

Farewelling Hannah and Pieter at the airport

Before we even took off on the first leg to Singapore we started to get an inkling about what was ahead! Ben and Sarah told us that intense rain had been falling for the previous few days over a widespread area of SE Queensland and Northern New South Wales. On that day alone 175 ml (approx 6.9. inches) had fallen between midnight to 3pm!

News about wet weather didn’t deter
us from celebrating our first trip
to Australia since 2019!

We arrived in Singapore to hear that the rain was still coming down relentlessly. There was flooding too – including a creek near them that had risen so much it flooded the road they needed to take to get to the airport (the other way was flooded too!)

No way through!

Later on, while we were waiting to board our flight bound for Brisbane, Ben let us know that the main route to the airport from the Western suburbs was flooded over, so even if they could have got through the local flooding they still couldn’t have reached the airport.

Flooding on the main road

There was still a back up plan – our lovely niece who lived on the “right”side of the flooding had offered to come and meet us.

We took off from Singapore hoping against hope that the floodwaters would have receded by the time we arrived in Brisbane. After all, we had waited for the moment when we would fall into the arms of Ben and Sarah at Brisbane airport for more than two long years!

Sadly, when we landed at Brisbane we received the grim news that not only Ben and Sarah were unable to meet us but our niece was also stuck as the road she lived on was threatening to flood too!

Rising creek levels in our niece’s road threatened to block the way
So much water!!

Fortunately for us, Ben and Sarah had the presence of mind to organise a hotel near the airport for us to stay in until the flood waters had receded. Who would have believed that after two and a half years wait we would end up in a hotel – effectively in quarantine! We sincerely hoped it wouldn’t be for two weeks!

Bad news about the flooding- people dead and others missing

The rain just kept coming and that evening Jonathan got absolutely drenched (despite borrowing a massive umbrella from the hotel) when he ran to buy takeaways from the Italian restaurant that was almost next door!

The following day the rain let up for a little bit and we began to hope that the flooding would recede. However, Brisbane’s water catchment dams were so full that the water authorities were compelled to release huge quantities of water to avoid the dams breaking their banks. Naturally this combined with the extreme quantities of rainwater that had fallen, meant the Brisbane River and was even more unruly and dangerous.

Dark clouds loom and threaten more rain

Fortunately, by the second afternoon we heard that our niece and her children would be able to come and visit us after all as the flooding near them hadn’t become worse and they were still able to get out of their road!

So great to see these guys after two and a half years – the children had grown so much!

It was so wonderful to see them after such a long time! We all went for a walk down to the nearby Brisbane River. It’s usual, rather easy going, flow had turned into a raging torrent with all sorts of debris floating down towards the sea – pieces of wharf, jet skis, and all sorts of building materials.

There was all sorts of debris floating down towards the sea – pieces of wharf, jet skis, and different types of building materials

Our niece very kindly offered to collect us the following day and take us to her place while we waited for the roads to Ben and Sarah’s to be passable again.

A rainbow from our hotel window giving
us a bit of hope

Finally we would be on our way to start our visit to Brisbane properly! Thank goodness our hotel “quarantine “ was two days and not two weeks!

Road trip Turkey to Germany

We left Viaport Marina near Istanbul having paid a deposit for an annual contract, and started the long trip back to the Netherlands in our campervan.

The long trip back to the Netherlands
We asked for water and this delightful young man happily obliged although at first he misunderstood and ran inside and brought out a bottle of the clear stuff!

After our night on the side of the road in a lonely and rather desolate location, we headed for the Turkish border with Bulgaria.

The Turkish border with Bulgaria

When we arrived there we suddenly realised we hadn’t suspended our Turkish phone accounts so we decided to turn round and visit a phone shop in the nearby city of Edirne.

We discovered (with the help of a lovely Turkish lady who had lived in London for a long time) that the SIM cards would still work for three months without us having to top them up, making our turnaround totally unnecessary! We were very pleased that we had retraced our steps however, because Edirne turned out to be delightful.

Saw these ancient structures in Edirne – maybe water storage cisterns?

Edirne is famed for its many mosques, domes and minarets. The Selimiye Mosque is particularly stunning and one of the most important monuments in the city. Built in 1575 it was designed by Turkey’s greatest master architect, Mimar Sinan.

Edirne is famed for its many mosques, domes and minarets.

Wandering along the pedestrian-only streets was very enjoyable – there was a bustling atmosphere, with numerous baklava shop windows to peer into and great sights to discover such as the gorgeous doors of the sixteenth century Rüstempaşa caravanserai (roadside inn).

Wandering along the pedestrian-only streets was very enjoyable
The baklava shop window displays
were amazing
We couldn’t resist!
One of the gorgeous doors of the sixteenth century Rüstempaşa caravanserai
Another of the beautiful doors to the caravanserai
Yep, this was definitely the Rüstempaşa caravanserai
The caravanserai from the car park

Stopping off for a tasty savoury pastry with Turkish çay at a tiny cafe, we watched the world go by until we realised time was ticking by and we should get back to our road trip.

Watching the world go by while we ate a savoury pastry accompanied by çay

We set off for the border again after enjoying our last experience of Turkish culture for a while.

A typical Turkish roadside scene

There were no problems at the border going into Bulgaria – we didn’t even have to show a Covid vaccination certificate! However we did have to drive through a special disinfection station which sprayed our van from every possible angle!

Good morning Bulgaria
Being sprayed to help stop the spread of Covid
On the road again

Towards late afternoon we caught sight of some snow on the side of the road but apart from that the weather was pleasant.

Snow on the side of the road

We stayed that evening in the same tiny little van park in Sofia that we’d stopped at on the way to Turkey.

Back in the tiny campervan site

The owner was on holiday in Austria but he was able to see us on his smart phone and unlock the gates for us remotely.

The wonders of modern technology opened this gate for us!

There was quite a lot of ice on the ground in the van park but nothing compared to the deep snow and compacted ice we had encountered last time.

Around 10am we left the van park and by 11.45 we were already approaching the Serbian border. Before we arrived we had to drive over the most appalling piece of “highway” that we’ve ever come across.

The appalling highway

It was unsealed, muddy, narrow and had diversions over huge potholes. It seemed that there had been no progress with the roadworks since we had encountered them a few months earlier.

Didn’t seem to be any progress since we last drove on this “highway”

Fortunately we weren’t held up too much and were soon across the border and in Serbia where the roads were in a lot better condition.

Welcome to Serbia!

Just as the sun was setting we arrived at the beautiful Lake Palić where we had spent the night on the way to Turkey, a few months previously.

A lovely camping spot at Lake Palić

We were able to go for a wonderful long walk around the peaceful lake while the setting sun produced a stunning light show on the glassy surface.

Such a beautiful sunset over the lake
The setting sun produced a stunning light show

The following morning we arrived at the Austrian border after just over an hour’s drive.

Jonathan heading off to buy a “vignette” to allow us to drive on toll roads in Austria
Another day, another country

We were planning to visit Vienna but Austria was still in the midst of lockdowns and travel restrictions so we decided against it. Instead we kept driving and found a good spot to stay the night a little further upstream of Vienna on the shores of the glorious Danube River.

A pretty scene in Austria

The river was lovely but it was biting cold so our evening walk was a short one!

The River Danube
Looking down from the flood protection dyke by the River Danube

Driving for long distances day after day could become boring but we keep ourselves entertained by listening to podcasts, recorded books and by noticing the quirky and /or interesting architecture, historical buildings and other landmarks that pop up along the way.

Driving back to the highway

In Austria we were intrigued to see the thought put into decorating the roundabouts (traffic circles).Within 15 minutes we saw one with a jet plane rising over it, one with some massive anchors on display, another with a mini arboretum in the centre and yet another with (strangely) a mini silo advertising a sugar museum.

We were intrigued to see the thought put into decorating the Austrian roundabouts
Giant anchors on this roundabout
A mini arboretum on this one!
A strange thing to put on a roundabout!

The last country we drove through before arriving in the Netherlands was Germany. We spent the night at a delightful campsite near Würzburg in the Bavaria region.

We arrive in Germany

We were able to camp right on the banks of the wide River Main and watch the massive barges carrying massive loads, ply their way along this important corridor.

We spent the night on the banks of
the River Main

Apart from having difficulty with getting water (the pipes were frozen) we had a good night and woke up the next day excited at the prospect of arriving at of destination of the Netherlands the following day.

Apart from a frozen hose pipe we had
a great night
The Netherlands at last

The end of one road trip and the beginning of another

After driving through snow for what seemed like weeks, it was such a pleasure to set off from the seaside town of Side on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey, in bright sunshine with a completely dry and ice-free road.

Driving out of the ancient ruins at Side in the bright sunshine

We were on our way to Finike where we had wintered over the previous year (2021). We thought it would be good to show the marina to our travel buddies Jan and Jack, maybe rest over for a night or two and catch up with friends we had made last year.

On our way from Side
We stopped off to buy delicious strawberries

After a lovely couple of days of rest and relaxation in Finike we recommenced our journey back to Didim 466 kilometres north.

Great to catch up with friends in Finike (Jan and Jack pictured with Jill from Eucalyptus)

It was lovely to see the snow sparkling on the mountains as we drove along the coast road and a great relief we were no longer inching our way down the steep and slippery mountain roads!

The snow sparkling on the mountains as we drove along the coast road

We stopped in the lovely little fishing village of Uçağız that sits within the series of stunning sheltered anchorages in the massive Kekova Bay.

The lovely little fishing village of Uçağız

We were keen to show Jan and Jack the fabulous seaside restaurant run by excellent chef and welcoming host Hassan and his lovely family.

Caps from yachties and other travellers decorate Hassan’s restaurant in Uçağız

Unfortunately, virtually every business in Uçağız was closed but by a stroke of luck Hassan and his wife happened to be in their restaurant and when they saw us they instantly recognised us and welcomed us inside.

Luckily, Hassan and his wife happened to be in their restaurant

They had no food to cook but generously made us tea and gave us juicy, refreshing oranges to eat.

Jack and Jan enjoying Hassan’s oranges

This generous welcome to travellers is so typical of Turkish culture. Wherever you go, even if you are complete stranger, you are fed and watered and made to feel really special.

We continued on towards Fethiye, another favourite place of ours. On the way we came across a very typical Turkish scene – a herd of goats wandering along the road.

A very Turkish scene!
The traffic will just have to wait!

A little later we were surprised to see snow at the roadside and even more surprised to see a large number of families having picnics in the snowiest spots. It was obviously a really unusual event!

We were surprised to see snow at the roadside and even more surprised to see a large number of families having picnics!

The snow soon disappeared and the rest of the journey unremarkable and soon we were in beautiful Fethiye, parked on the sea front just over the road from the hotel Jan and Jack had selected.

Parked in our favourite location- near the water and boats!
Always love Fethiye
Just a short walk into town

That evening we walked into the town centre for a really good meal and some great live music at a restaurant called Piraye.

We had a good evening here
Jan in one of the many lanes of the covered market

It was great to arrive back at the marina the following day and we were relieved to find Sunday shipshape and looking good.

Last leg

We had a lot to do in the following week before getting back in the road to drive back to the Netherlands.

One of the exciting developments was getting Sunday measured up for a new very light and large foresail that would enable us to sail more successfully in light winds.

Measuring up for the new bowsprit

Although a spinnaker style sail, it would be on a roller for ease of use and to enable this a new bowsprit needed to be installed.

Securely tied on for the job!

We also needed to organise some other jobs such as finally fixing our wayward passerelle once and for all. Two unsuccessful attempts to stop the leaking hydraulic fluid had been made and we decided that new parts would have to be ordered from Greece where the passerelle (electronic gangplank) was made.

Our wayward passerelle

In order to avoid the dreaded Turkish customs process (we had heard of people waiting for many months to obtain boat parts) we had the bits sent to our daughter‘s home in the Netherlands.

One day we had a visit from a very curious cat who examined everything very carefully and wandered round “Sunday” as though she owned the place.

A little visitor to Sunday
She was very curious
Our guest wandered all over the boat
Finally she decided not to move in!

We were sad to be leaving the marina for a couple of months as we had met a great group of people there, however we were excited about our drive back to the Netherlands.

A birthday dinner for Marianna
on “Aussie” Anthem
Our last night- Jonathan made a friend
at the restaurant!

Our first stop was Viaport Marina in Istanbul. We were planning to make this marina our base in the coming year as we were hoping to go on the Black Sea Rally.

Our trip to Viaport Marina near Istanbul

John from our buddy boat Catabella joined us on this leg as he and Sue (who was off visiting family) were also planning to make this marina their winter base (in fact Sue did the research to find it!)

Nearly there

We were pleased to have this opportunity to view the marina and it’s surrounds before making a decision on whether to take out a contract for a year.

We travelled over the Izmit Bay Suspension Bridge at the easternmost edge of the Sea of Marmara which connects the Aegean Sea to the Black Sea.

About to cross the Sea if Mamara

Less than half an hour later we were parked in front of the Crowne Plaza Hotel. John was hoping to stay the night there as it was just a stone’s throw away from the marina but unfortunately it was closed. We found a good hotel for him a little further away.

We parked near The Crowne Plaza

There were quite a few snack bars and restaurants behind the marina but they seemed to be more international pizza and burger style eateries rather than the more traditional cafes that we prefer. However, there was also a really well stocked supermarket, an aquarium, a water park, a lion park, a “big wheel” as well as a range of outlet stores.

The big wheel at Biaport Marina

The marina is only 20 minutes from Istanbul’s second airport and there is a metro station 15 minutes away from which you can travel to the centre of Istanbul.

The staff at the marina office were very charming and welcoming and willingly showed us round the marina in the pouring rain.

Jonathan in the administration office
at Viaport Marina

We were quite impressed by the cleanliness of the water, the ample turning space and good facilities, including a self serve laundry. The security seemed to excellent and there was access into the supermarket using your finger print.

We were quite impressed with the
marina facilities

Having received a good offer for year’s contract which included a month on the hardstanding and a bonus of an extra two months, we decided to sign up and pay a deposit.

We decided to make Viaport Marina our base for the next year

Later on that day we started our long 3,000 kilometres (approx 1,800 miles) road trip to The Netherlands where we would stay with our daughter and son-in-law before returning to Australia for the first time in two and a half years.

A rainy start to our long trip

It was pouring with rain when we set off that afternoon so we decided not to make for a specific destination but just to drive as far as we could go by early evening.

We turned off the toll road after driving about three and a half hours and found ourselves in a very rural area with tiny villages dotted between large tracts of agricultural land.

We found ourselves in a very rural area with tiny villages dotted between large tracts of agricultural land
Then we drove past this – we couldn’t work out what it was! Still a mystery.

It was difficult to find anywhere to pull off! No car parks, no sports centres, no parks, not even a lay by!

This was the only spot we could find to park but it wasn’t ideal – the place felt very uncomfortable

After meandering along miles of country lanes we came across a very isolated, gothic looking, building at the end of a very long and lonely road. If it had still been raining, it would have evoked The Rocky Horror Show. It was absolutely miles from anywhere and definitely felt very creepy.

This place felt very creepy

The sign swinging in the breeze read Bakucha and on googling the name we found the following: “Set on a leafy 200-hectare wine estate, this tranquil hotel is 23 km from the town of Lüleburgaz and 23 km from the D565 road.” We were tempted to go in and get a bed for the night but turned around and followed the lane back to a spot (the only one!) we had spied earlier next to what looked like an electricity substation.

We were tempted to go in and get a bed
for the night

Thankfully we had a reasonably good night there but I did wake up twice to the sound of an engine running and peeped out of the bathroom window to see headlights from a stationary vehicle just metres away. This was definitely unnerving as we were so far from anywhere and we didn’t know if the cars belonged to curious locals or someone with ill intent.

Waking up next to a sun station – nice!

Fortunately, we woke up the next morning in one piece with everything intact and were soon on our way heading for Edirne near the Turkish border with Bulgaria, feeling that somehow we’d “dodged a bullet”.

Fortunately, we woke up the next morning in one piece

Stuck in the snow in arctic conditions

We woke to a silent world – it had snowed again! This was the fourth day of snowfall in Cappadocia and each morning the blanket of snow became thicker and icier.

Göreme’s Main Street under a blanket
of snow and ice

Although we were very warm inside the camper, outside was a different story – it was minus six degrees Celsius in Göreme and our home on wheels looked more like a odd shaped snowball than a mighty van!

Our home on wheels looked more like a odd shaped snowball than a mighty van

We had to work hard to open the door to get outside as a snowplough had been along earlier and pushed a great wedge of icy snow against the side of the van.

There was a big pile of snow against the van
My footmarks from exiting the van

Once out, we trudged up the hill (with a bit of slipping and sliding) to Jan and Jack’s cave hotel for another delicious Turkish breakfast.

Snowy plant pots at Jan and Jack’s hotel

The view of Göreme from their terrace would have been stunning regardless of the snow but with the thick layer of sparkling white sprinkled over the cave dwellings it looked truly magical.

The magical view from
Jan and Jack’s hotel terrace

When we got back to the van we realised that we were pretty stuck. Snow was banked up against our wheels and it looked pretty unlikely that we’d be able to get out.

We were stuck!

Fortunately we had thought to buy a spade in Konya where we first encountered snow. Named “Jack’s shovel” as he’d been the one to find it (in heroic fashion of course) it was put to good use against the ice and snow. Another one was borrowed from a local hotel and even with two shovels going hard, we were still unable to get the van going .

Jack working on getting our van’s wheels cleared of snow

We were wondering if we would be stuck there until the snow melted! With the temperatures predicted to go down to minus 14 degrees Celsius that night and minus 15 the following day/night we were becoming a little anxious about the welfare of our camper van. It really wasn’t built for these arctic conditions. The windscreen wash was already frozen and that morning we had discovered we couldn’t get rid of our waste water as the emptying mechanism had frozen solid too.

Minus 14 or 15 degrees Celsius is too cold for our van
Snow drifts and icy paths in Göreme

After some time of trying to dig our way out a friendly local stopped to help out. Somehow he managed to get the attention of a young snow plough driver who sped up to us, did a couple of balletic “doughnuts” in the snow and almost in one movement, gracefully jumped off his snowplough and attached a strap to the rear underside of the van. Sadly, there are no photos of this gallant rescue!

A snowplough similar to the one
that rescued us

Before Jonathan had time to release the handbrake our young rescuer hauled the camper out of the snow – it popped out like a cork from a bottle!

We made the decision to leave the snowy wilds of Cappadocia and head for the warmer coastal climes. Although there were still more sights we wanted to visit we’d managed to see the main highlights and it just wasn’t worth risking anything else going wrong with the van.

We decided to leave the snowy wilds of Cappadocia

We set off at about 11.30 and discovered that the roads were even worse than they had been on the way there. The route out of Goreme had some quite steep hills with severe bends in places. We were a little anxious that we would not manage to negotiate these before getting to the main highway which we hoped would be a little bit more manageable. Jonathan took it very carefully and fortunately we managed the obstacles with nothing untoward happening.

Once we hit the main road the driving was a little easier for a while but then we would come across parts that hadn’t been cleared or recently gritted and it started to feel very precarious once again. We inched our way forward just concentrating on making slow and steady progress.

Once we hit the main road the driving was a little easier for a while
Then we would come across parts that hadn’t been cleared or recently gritted
We inched our way forward just concentrating on making slow and steady progress

We stopped for a rest and some lunch in a roadside restaurant with a lovely warm log burning stove.

Sitting next to this log burning stove was so cosy and warm

Continuing our journey we admired the beautiful snow scenes but as we made our way down the mountain range, the windscreen wash remained frozen and the poor visibility contributed to the “extreme” driving conditions. We cheered with relief every time it became one degree warmer!

The snow scenes were very beautiful
The windscreen wash remained frozen and the poor visibility contributed to the “extreme” driving conditions
We cheered with relief every time it became one degree warmer
It felt very precarious much of the time

Soon the sun became lower in the sky and we watched the dying rays turn the mountain ranges a beautiful luminous rosy pink and orange.

The sun became lower in the sky
We watched the dying rays turn the mountain ranges a beautiful luminous rosy pink and orange.
The light was beginning to fail
The mountain ranges glowing in the setting sun
The view of night fall through
our filthy windscreen

We arrived in Side, a coastal town on the southern Mediterranean coast of Turkey, pretty exhausted. As it had been a very tiring day Jonathan and I decided we would have a night in a hotel so we could enjoy a longer shower than normal and be able to roll out of bed for breakfast in the dining room.

Jan and Jack found a place to stay in the “old town” which sounded interesting but when we arrived to the entrance of the old town we were told we weren’t allowed to drive the van in there! By this time it was dark and we very tired and hungry.

The entrance to our hotel
There was a lot of building and restoration work going on in Side

Fortunately we quickly found a massive car park nearby where we could leave the van overnight. To our relief there was a taxi rank in one corner and we all piled into a cab. We told the driver the name of our hotel and he took us to a place that wasn’t even in the old city and looked very closed!

Our extremely dirty but now ice-free van

Eventually we managed to convey to him that where we were staying was within the old city. We entered via the gate we had tried to go through earlier and found ourselves driving through an ancient city gate with ghostly ruins looming in the dark.

There were excavations still happening in Side
Roman columns in a Side street

We were soon out of the ancient city and right in the village near the harbour but our driver seemed to be completely lost. He sped around the deathly quiet streets as though he was a race leader in the Monte Carlo Rally.

The small Side harbour

We were trying to navigate using Google Maps but the driver was going so fast that we kept missing turnings. It was late, it was dark, we were hungry and tired and if it hadn’t been for sharp eyed Jan catching sight of the name of our hotel I think the driver’s days would have been limited!

Even though it was warmer down by the coast than in the mountains, it was still bitterly cold. There had been a fall of snow that day – the first in the area for many years.

Despite the sunshine it was bitterly cold in Side

Thank goodness there was somewhere open for dinner a short walk away – probably wasn’t the best meal we’ve had and it was expensive by Turkish standards but we were grateful nonetheless.

Unfortunately the reversed cycle air conditioning in our room was less than functional and our bed (which we had to make) had very few coverings. As a consequence we shivered all night! If the van hadn’t been parked such a long way away we would have gone back to enjoy its wonderful heating!

The route to our breakfast

We woke up feeling a little grumpy but soon our moods were lifted by the most marvellous breakfast at a restaurant close to the small fishing boat harbour.

Feelings of grumpiness were demolished by the fantastic breakfast

After stuffing ourselves with food (eggs, pastries, pizza, pancakes, salad, olives, cheese, fruit and lashings of bread with every jam, preserve and spread you can think of) we waddled around the harbour wall, admiring the beautiful fishing boats and watching the fishermen mend their nets.

We took doggy bags and ate some of
this food for lunch
Couldn’t fit in another bite!
Admiring the beautiful fishing boats

Later we walked to the edge of the village to catch a taxi. Beyond the taxi rank we could see archeological remains and were tempted to stay longer and wander round the ruins. However, by that time we had organised a taxi so decided to keep that for another day.

Beyond the taxi rank we could see archeological remains
We were tempted to stay longer and wander round the ruins
Taken from the taxi on the way back
to the car park

The highs and lows of Cappadocia

There was so much snow in Goreme, Cappadocia, that we couldn’t find a suitable place to park our campervan for the night. We ended up stopping outside a small supermarket just off the main road in a spot kept reasonably clear of snow by the steady stream of cars arriving and departing.

Snowy Göreme

Once we had parked safely we were fine – although the temperature was well into minus temperatures we were lovely and warm thanks to our very effective diesel heater.

I was awakened the next morning by a most peculiar and really loud whooshing noise – and it was literally just above my head!

I quickly jumped out of bed and peered out of the window to see what was making the strange sound. Just above the roof of the shop next door was a massive hot air balloon rising gracefully upwards! It must have been very low as it drifted over the campervan roof – no wonder it sounded so loud!

I was awakened by a loud wooshing noise just above my head
No wonder it was noisy – the balloon must have been very low when it went over the van.

Cappadocia is the capital of hot air ballooning in Turkey but because of the snow there were only a few balloons out that morning.

We met up again with Jan and Jack after breakfast and decided to head for the Derinkuyu – the largest excavated underground city in Turkey.

On the road to Derinkuyu

This very ancient and sprawling network of caves – carved into the soft volcanic rock – probably dates back to the 7th or 8th Century BC and was expanded during early Christian times.

The sprawling network of caves probably dates back to the 7th or 8th Century BC
The cave network was expanded during early Christian times.

The city was fully formed by the Byzantine era when local people used it to escape the Arab incursions from 780–1180 AD.

The city was fully formed by the Byzantine era

Reaching a depth of around 85 metres, (approx 280 feet) the city is on at least five levels (probably many more) and even connects with other underground cities in the Cappadocia region.

The city reaches a depth of 85 metres,
(approx 280 feet)
The caves connect with other underground cities in the Cappadocia region

I thought I might feel claustrophobic but I was fine most of the time even though I did feel a bit nervous as we travelled deeper – especially going through very narrow tunnels where we had to stoop low so as not to hit our heads or backs.

I thought I might feel claustrophobic but I was fine most of the time
I did feel a bit nervous as we travelled deeper – especially going through very narrow tunnels

We had a very good guide who explained that the city was not inhabited all the time but was used mostly during time of attack or unrest to keep women and children safe.

We had a very good guide
Our guide explained that the city was used mostly during times of attack

Having said that, there were stables, wine and oil presses, food storage areas and even a Church and a morgue so people must have spent a fair amount of time down there!

There were there were stables, wine and oil presses and food storage areas in the caves
There was even a Church

It was fascinating to see the different areas of the underground city and imagine what life was must have been like down there.

It was fascinating to imagine what life must have been like down there

One thing I was surprised about was how fresh the air was – even on the lowest level. This is because there was a 55 feet deep ventilation shaft that ensured fresh air could enter. There would have been many of these when Derinkuyu was in its heyday.

There was a 55 feet deep ventilation shaft that ensured fresh air could enter. Here spiders webs hang from the shaft – frozen solid

I felt relieved to be back above ground even though it had snowed again and it was bitterly cold.

There was more freshly fallen snow when we came to the surface
This is the top of a 55 feet deep ventilation shaft
Despite the snow, business must still go on

Before we left Derinkuyu Jonathan and Jack decided to use an ingenious method to unfreeze the van’s windscreen washer. Despite having antifreeze in the reservoir, and being reasonably close to the warmth of the engine, the fluid inside had frozen solid (we think the garage in Izmir helpfully topped up the reservoir with water after the “cat-astrophe”).

Jonathan and Jack decided to use an ingenious method to unfreeze the van’s
windscreen washer

They started our trusty generator and plugged in the fan heater Jan and Jack had brought along in case of cold hotel rooms. The fan heater was wedged to allow maximum heat to the reservoir without melting the plastic. Genius! Unfortunately it didn’t work. The ice remained completely solid.

A curious puppy came up for a look

Apart from having to drive with a filthy windscreen, the van was behaving brilliantly in temperatures well below any vehicle’s comfort zone.

We drove back towards other “must see” sights such as Love Valley with its phallic “tower-shaped” rock formations but the snow prevented us from getting there. The roads had been ploughed but all the side lanes and entrances were blocked.

The phallic “tower-shaped” rock formations of Love Valley

Likewise we were unable to access the Goreme Open Air Museum to see the fabulous Byzantine frescoes in the Churches and Monasteries that are carved into the rocks.

We were unable to access the Göreme
Open Air Museum

We did manage to find our way to a magnificent lookout perched high in the hills where we could see for miles across the valley with the ubiquitous rock formations of Cappadocia below.

We could see for miles across the valley
Jonathan and Jack pose for a sweet picture

We were the only people there so we had the magnificent snowy vistas to ourselves. There was a lonely coffee caravan so of course, we had to patronise it. Further on we found a row of tourist shops and cafes but again, no one was there.

The lonely coffee van
Further on we found a row of
tourist shops and cafes – completely deserted
The imposing valley where snow dominated everything!

Retracing our steps to the road we kept going towards the small town of Urgup and on the way we happily encountered the Turasan winery which had been recommended by several yachtie friends.

We happily encountered the Turasan winery

We spent a very pleasant time by the fire tasting some excellent wine! And of course, we bought a few bottles to take away too.

We spent a very pleasant time by the fire tasting some excellent wine
Jack looking the part!
Cheers everyone!

It was quite late in the afternoon by the time we reached Urgup itself and we made the decision to find a museum to look round (it was getting seriously cold).

We made the decision to find a
museum to look round

We looked up “museums in Urgup” and followed the route on the map which took us up a narrow (snow covered) lane to a small cave-like entrance. we made the decision to find a museum to look round

We entered into a long hall-like room

We wandered in to a long hall-like room carved deep in the rock. Around the walls there were alcoves with brightly coloured cushions, some lovely rugs on the stone floor and signs of weaving activity.

Around the walls there were alcoves with brightly coloured cushions

There was nowhere to pay and no information so we just wandered in thinking there would be a reception desk at the next level. We followed our noses along a passageway carved out of stone that sloped upwards and twisted and turned.

We followed our noses along a passageway carved out of stone
Was this an escape route?

On the next level was a terrace which would normally have had a great view of the town but was of course very snowy and all we could see was low cloud.

On the next level was a terrace which would normally have had a great view
No view that day!

We continued to a door that was ajar and inside the room we found a young man who seemed rather surprised to see us!

The room behind the door

The room was set up in a very traditional way with lovely old rugs, home carved tables and a cradle, lots of cushions, and more weaving apparatus.

The room was set up in a very traditional way with lovely old rugs and big cushions

The young man told us his family had lovingly restored the old cave house and set it up as a museum to show how people had lived in the past. It was so interesting!

The house was set up as a museum
The museum showed how people
had lived in the past

Time was marching on so we wound our way back through the sloping stone passageway and back outside to find the van.

We wound our way back through the
sloping stone passageway
There were sheep living on one of the terraces

When we arrived back in Goreme was already getting dark and more snow had fallen. Our camping spot from the night before was empty but there was a bit of snow shovelling to do to with the excellent spade that Jack bought in Konya!

Driving back to Göreme
When we arrived back in Göreme it was already getting dark and more snow had fallen.
There was a bit of snow shovelling to do to

We had another excellent meal in a lovely warm restaurant and afterwards walked in a snowstorm back to Jack and Jan’s hotel for a nightcap in their lovely cave accommodation.

This wood burning stove and open fire
kept us very warm
Jan waiting for her dinner to be served
We walked in a snowstorm back to Jack and Jan’s hotel
Jack serves a drink in their “Cave suite”

It was still snowing when left to return “home” and as we slipped and slid our way home the whole scene looked just like a Christmas card – it was absolutely beautiful!

It was still snowing when left to return “home”
The whole scene looked like a Christmas card
So beautiful!

Finding a frosty fairyland in flurries of snow and freezing conditions

Waking up on a garage forecourt to the sounds of a snowplough clearing yet another freshly fallen blanket of snow was just one of the many unusual experiences that we have encountered on our road trip in Turkey.

The garage workers clear the snow off the roof of a customer’s car

We were on our way to Cappadocia – a region of natural wonders and probably one of the most famous tourist destinations in Turkey. The day before we had driven from Konya through snow flurries and freezing conditions, travelling as far as Aksaray where we decided to stop for the night as road conditions were fairly precarious.

After a good sleep on the garage forecourt we had breakfast and then we crawled through the still snowy city streets in our van to Jan and Jack’s hotel where we found them looking bleary after contending with a burglar alarm that rang constantly throughout the night.

We crawled through the still snowy city streets in our van

We decided between us to try and keep going but thought we should check to see if the roads to Cappadocia were open. Jan asked the hotel receptionist who rang the police hotline. The message was loud and clear: Do not travel, the roads are closed.

A lot of fresh snow had fallen in the night

An hour or so later we tried again and the message was the same. Despite this, we decided to to go and check out the main route to Göreme – arguably the best town to stay in when visiting the Cappadocia area.

The roads were very snowy to be sure but they seemed no worse than the previous day and there were no road blocks or any activity to prevent us driving on them.

The roads to Cappadocia were declared closed by the police
Fortunately the roads weren’t crowded

So off we went – very carefully and slowly! The all-weather tyres on our van held us steady and Jonathan drove with extreme concentration and skill.

The countryside was buried deep in snow
It really did look stunning!
Jonathan drove with extreme concentration and skill

Just over an hour later we started to see the first of the ubiquitous rock formations that Cappadocia is famous for.

We started to see the first of the ubiquitous rock formations that Cappadocia is famous for

We were all instantly captivated by the beauty of the so-called “fairy chimneys” made even more stunning by the sprinkling of shimmering snow, looking for all the world like sparkling fairy dust.

We were all instantly captivated by the beauty of the so-called “fairy chimneys”

We caught sight of the magical Uchisar Castle which had, throughout history, been the main point of defence for the Cappadocia region.

The magical Uchisar Castle
Finding a frosty fairyland

We stopped to take some photos of the castle and have a look around. Our poor camper van looked very icy and travel worn.

Our poor camper van looked very icy and travel worn
So much ice packed into the wheel arches it was surprising that the wheels could turn!
The snow on the roof started to melt and then froze again on the way down
The views were so photogenic

Soon we were on our way again for the last bit of the icy journey to Göreme.

More “fairy houses” on the way to Göreme
What an amazing view as we
drove into Göreme
The snow enhanced the natural beauty of the rock formations
Sorry, I just couldn’t stop taking photos

From what we could see the little town was delightful with lots of little cave hotels carved into rock formations and many nice looking cafes and restaurants. And it was all covered in white icing!

The small town of Göreme looked delightful
It was very quiet in the town – not many tourists for some reason!
There were many hotels built in caves
and rock formations

While Jan and Jack looked for a nice hotel we said hello to some beautiful Antatolian Shepherd dogs. These lovely animals are livestock guardians and in Turkey are often found roaming on the streets. Despite their size they are gentle and respectful and we’ve never seen one behave aggressively.

We said hello to some beautiful Antatolian Shepherd dogs

Once Jan and Jack had found a good hotel and settled in happily we set off to visit the Zelve open air museum, said to be one of the most visually stunning historical sites in Turkey.

On the way to the Zelve open air museum
There were some gorgeous sights on the way
Fairy chimneys on the way to Zelve
Looks like the fairies were snowed in!

The museum consists of three valleys where the rock formations are filled with caves that were once dwellings or churches.

Jan and Jack exploring Zelve open air museum

Zelve was in fact, a monastic retreat from the 9th to the 13th century and then later became a village. It is one of the earliest-settled and last-abandoned monastic valleys in Cappadocia.

Zelve was a monastic retreat from the 9th to the 13th century
An inviting cave entrance

Unbelievably, the caves were inhabited until 1952 when finally serious erosion made it too dangerous to live in and the villagers were resettled nearby.

This is what was inside!

It was wonderful to follow a walking trail that had been mostly cleared of snow (although still slippery!) and to climb up some stairs to caves that had been part of the monastery. It was very atmospheric!

The caves were very atmospheric
We found it amazing that these structures still looked so fresh

It was getting towards late afternoon and quite chilly which made us wonder how on earth the people who had dwelled there over the centuries kept themselves warm. What hardships they must have experienced!

What hardships people must have
experienced living here
We wondered how on earth people living here kept themselves warm in winter
The caves were inhabited until 1952
The very tiny holes were for pigeons
– a useful food source
Some of the interiors looked precarious

One of the cave settlements was way up a high cliff. The intrepid three Js ((Jonathan, Jan and Jack) climbed all the way up and explored the network of caves up there (see photo).

Forgive my clumsy drawing but can you see Jan way up high?!
Hard to believe people were still living
here in my lifetime
There would have several families living in the cave complex
We felt sad for the villagers who had lived in the caves all their lives – hopefully they adapted happily to their new homes!

The sun was getting very low as we drove back to Goreme, slipping and sliding all the way.

The sun was beginning to set
We enjoyed the views on the way
back to Göreme

That evening we found a cosy restaurant built in a cave where we had a delightful dinner and a very enjoyable bottle of local red wine. It felt amazing to be in Cappadocia at last despite the snow and ice!

The restaurant was built inside a cave
The local red wine was very drinkable
A great way to end an exciting day!

Whirling dervishes and swirling snow!

We had made it into Konya in the Central Anatolia region of Turkey just in time to grab a taxi from Jan and Jack’s (our friends and fellow yachties) hotel to go to the Mevlana Cultural Centre for the weekly “whirling dervish” ceremony.

The whirling dervishes of Konya

The whirling dervishes belong to the Mevlevi Sufi order of Islam established by the followers of Rumi, the 13th Century Persian poet, Islamic scholar and Sufi mystic whose final resting place was Konya.

The dervishes are followers of the 13th Century poet and mystic, Rumi who is buried in Konya

The Sufi dervishes aim to reach “the source of all perfection” by performing a meditative swirling dance to enchanting music.

We arrived at the cultural centre in plenty of time and were immediately impressed with the size and grandeur of the domed building.

We were immediately impressed with the size and grandeur of the cultural centre

Inside the auditorium, there was a large raked orchestra pit, on each side of which were row upon row of seats fanning out in a gigantic circle leaving a large space in the centre for the Sufi to perform their meditative dance.

The large raked orchestra pit

The auditorium was almost empty – probably due to Covid and maybe also because of the extremely cold weather. We had prime seats!

Bang on the start time the ceremony began with the sheikh (the sacred leader of the Sufi order) walking into the auditorium ceremoniously carrying a red sheepskin.

The sheik entered carrying a red sheepskin

A single ethereal voice was singing a poetic prayer written by Sumi while the sheik knelt in front of us and bowed deeply. He then walked across to greet the troop of Sufi practitioners as they filed in one by one.

The sheik knelt in front of us
and bowed deeply.

The Sufi were dressed in black cloaks and wore tall felted camel hair hats on their heads.

The Sufi were dressed in black cloaks

When all the “dancers” had filed in (there were more than twenty of them) the sheik moved into the middle while the dervishes walked slowly around the perimeter of the performance area three times, each time bowing deeply to the person in front and then pivoting to walk backwards and bowing to the the dervish behind. It was quite mesmerising to watch.

The dervishes bowed deeply to the person in front and then pivoted to walk backwards, bowing again before turning again

After this the sheik went back to his red lambs-wool which sat in the centre of a beautiful oriental rug placed right in front of us. The sufi dancers took their cloaks off revealing a long white circular skirt with a stiff white bodice tucked in and a black sash holding the two parts together. Underneath all this they wore long white pants (trousers).

The sufis took their cloaks off

The music and singing intensified and soon the signature circling movement of the whirling dervishes began.

Soon the signature circling movement of the whirling dervishes began.

Each dervish launched into slow circling movements, rotating on the ball of their left foot and performing an exact 360 degree turn using their right foot. Once they had starting turning they joined the line of dancers circling around the “stage”, moving in unison like cogs in a machine.

Each dervish turned rotating on the ball of their left foot and performing an exact 360 degree turn
As the rotations gained momentum the dervishes’ right hand slowly travelled upwards eventually rising to be directed to the sky

The dervishes started their circling with their hands crossed over their body and as the rotations gained momentum their right hand slowly travelled upwards eventually rising up to the sky, ready to receive Allah’s blessings. Meanwhile their left hand, where their gaze was directed, pointed to the earth to send out to the world the grace and light they had received.

Their left hands pointed to the earth to send out the grace and light they had received

The music was mystical and unearthly – and very beautiful. The turning of the Sufi dancers became hypnotic and we felt drawn into their meditation as they whirled round gracefully like planets circling the sun.

The turning of the Sufi dancers
became hypnotic
They whirled round gracefully like planets circling the sun

As they twirled, a second elder watched and guided the dancers where needed, stepping in front of anyone going too fast or too close to another dervish.

A second elder watched and guided the dancers where needed
The second elder stood in front of any of the sufis going too fast

The whirling meditation lasted about an hour and was absolutely captivating – even the most cynical of us agreed that it was a remarkable and haunting ceremony. We all felt a deep appreciation for the devotion of the participants and their determination to spread more peace and love in the world.

The whirling lasted about an hour and was absolutely captivating
It was a remarkable and haunting ceremony

We walked back to the hotel and the nearby car park where we would stay the night in our camper van.

The night was crisp and cold and as we walked past the famous 16th Century Selimiye Mosque and the next door funerary shrine complex dedicated to Rumi, the white marble sparkled and shone in the icy air.

The famous 16th Century Selimiye Mosque and the next door funerary shrine complex dedicated to Rumi

The following morning after a cosy sleep in Frieda, our diesel heated van we woke to a distinct hush in the air. I looked out of the window only to find that the world was covered in a deep blanket of snow!

The world was covered in a deep
blanket of snow

It must have snowed heavily most of the night as it was at least six inches (15.24 cm) deep.

It was at least six inches (15.24 cm) deep.

Jack had to go out (in boots borrowed from Jonathan) and buy boots for Jan and himself as their sneakers just weren’t going to hack it in that kind of weather!

Konya looked stunning covered in snow
A sparkling fairy land

While Jack was out boot shopping he was also on a side mission to find a spade (perhaps we would have to dig ourselves out?!) After several attempts he at last found a hardware store with a spade. Unfortunately it had no handle! Shop assistants were dispatched to look for a handle in other hardware stores and eventually one was located and he returned triumphant with boots in one hand and an excellent shovel in the other!

Fortunately we didn’t need to shovel snow to get out of the car park – leaving after midday, we just drove very gingerly out on to the small lane on which Jack and Jan’s hotel sat.

Fortunately we didn’t need to shovel snow to get out of the car park

Very slowly we edged along the lane to the main road. Despite the dangerous conditions, all we could think of was the beauty of the freshly fallen snow.

Despite the dangerous conditions, all we could think of was the beauty around us

Everywhere we looked was blindingly white – the trees were laden with thick bright white powder and glistened in the frosty air.

The trees were laden with thick
bright white powder

Slowly, slowly we drove out of town and all went well until we hit the main highway to Cappadocia.

We had only been driving a few minutes when we came to a stationary traffic queue. We sat going nowhere for half an hour until the traffic started to crawl along at snail’s pace.

All went well until we hit the main
highway to Cappadocia

We couldn’t work out if there had been an accident or if the police were trying to turn people round. Maybe they were waiting for the snow ploughs to go through?

Jonathan taking the opportunity to clean the windscreen while in a traffic queue

Eventually we were on our way although the conditions were pretty bleak.

Eventually we were on our way
Icicles hanging from a truck- it was very cold!
The conditions were pretty bleak

For a while we followed in the tracks of a snow plough but we caught up with it and found it pulling out a car that had skidded off the highway.

For a while we followed in the
tracks of a snow plough

We were then driving on fresh snow in very windy conditions which made visibility even worse. Thanking our lucky stars that we’d put new all-weather tyres on Frieda recently, we ploughed on to Aksaray – the nearest town to the amazing region of Cappadocia.

We were driving on fresh snow in
very windy conditions
We thanked our lucky stars that we’d put new all-weather tyres on Frieda recently

We were hoping to reach Göreme that day but decided that as it was at a greater altitude than Aksaray, there was a good chance that conditions on the way could be worse.

We ploughed on to Aksaray – the nearest town to the amazing region of Cappadocia

After dropping Jan and Jack off at their hotel we looked for somewhere to stay the night. The hotel car park was completed snowed-in and, it turned out, so was everywhere else. Even the entry to the local sports centre – usually a useful standby parking place – was totally impassable.

The hotel car park was completely snowed-in
There was nowhere to park the camper van
Even the local sports centre was impassable

We ended up asking the workers in the local petrol (gas) station if we could camp on their forecourt as that was just about the only space cleared of snow that we could find.

A service station was was just about the only space cleared of snow that we could find
Still very snowy but not as bad as
everywhere else

Fortunately, the Turkish people are as a race, the most hospitable and generous people you could wish to meet. They said “of course“, offered us their rest room to sleep in (which while sweet was of course unnecessary) and even brought us steaming cups of delicious çay (tea) to welcome us.

The Turks are the most hospitable and generous people you could wish to meet.

On the way to Turkey in our “land yacht”

Our stay in the Netherlands was drawing to a close and we were busy getting ready to drive our “land yacht” (aka our camper van) back to Turkey.

Our “land yacht”

Loaded up with enough food and other essentials to last us for at least a few weeks, we set off on a rainy, miserable day.

We set off on a rainy, miserable day.

As usual, it was sad to farewell our daughter and son-in-law but as they were booked to fly to Turkey in just a few weeks for Christmas we didn’t feel as sad as usual. However, with Covid numbers rising and the threat of restrictions being reintroduced, it was by no means a done deal that they would arrive as planned.

One last selfie before leaving!

Our first stop was Bremen in north-west Germany. We had ordered some new equipment for our boat from the sailing megastore SVB Bremen which we had expected to be delivered to the Netherlands. When the items didn’t turn up we called to find out why and were told they hadn’t been couriered because the store didn’t accept credit card payment from new customers. Would have been good if they could have told us beforehand!

Crossing the border into Germany

So, having paid by bank draft, we once again eagerly waited delivery of the goods, hoping they would arrive before our departure date. But no, at the eleventh hour the store let us know that their bank had charged a fee when the transfer came through and they couldn’t release the goods until we had paid them the shortfall created by the charges.

By then it was too late for the goods to be couriered so we had to drive there to collect them. The irony was that because we picked the goods up, the bill was reduced and we were owed a refund!

Having finally picked up our boat bits with no further issues we looked for somewhere to stay the night. We thought it would be easy to find a spot but the camper van park in Bremen was packed to the rafters!

The campervan park in Bremen was full!

We squeezed into one of the last spaces with some difficulty as the ground was incredibly muddy and the space extremely small with bushes in front of it that we had to plough through to get into the space!

We just about managed to squeeze into the last available space!

The weather was still rainy and dull the following day but before setting off again we had a nice walk to the nearby River Weser which is the longest river to flow entirely in Germany.

The River Weser

All along the lane we walked along there were holiday homes – some reasonably large and others tiny but they were all very neatly kept and each one had a cute sign on their gate.

One of the smaller holiday homes
Each gate had a cute sign
A family and their animals!
This one was a bit fishy

Our next stop was meant to be a nice looking farm site in Leipzig Nordost but when we arrived we quickly realised that the place was well and truly closed.

Driving out of Bremen
The camper stop at this farm was well and truly closed

The proprietor was busy splitting logs with a power saw and had ear muffs on. When he eventually realised we were there, he told us that the authorities had declared the whole area closed to tourists due to Covid. He advised us to drive to Halle where there were no such rules.

Arriving in Halle – lots to see!

So we were back on the road again but before too long we were in Halle – birthplace of my Mum’s favourite composer – George Frideric Handel.

A punny sign!
A statue of Handel
A portrait of Handel

Fortunately we found a car park where we could free camp amongst circus vehicles, trucks and one other camper van.

We eventually found this car park close to the centre of Halle where we could stay

Halle has some truly magnificent buildings but we were shocked to see how much graffiti there was everywhere.

There were some truly magnificent
buildings in Halle
We were impressed with the architecture
But we were amazed by the graffiti!
The graffiti was terrible!
An antidote to all the graffiti- a dolls house sized milliner’s shop

Walking around the town we felt very moved to see on the exterior wall of the Cathedral, a memorial for the East German uprising of 1953 which was violently suppressed by tanks of the Soviet forces.

The memorial for the East German
uprising of 1953
Halle Cathedral

After finding the “Handel Haus” where Handel was born in 1685, we found ourselves near the Domplatz (cathedral square) where a kind of Christmas market was set up in the grounds of what was once a monastery. Because of Covid there was nothing actually on sale but there were plenty of Christmas trees, baubles and other festive decorations in little huts. Each hut was decorated differently – we weren’t sure if it was a competition or just different interpretations of Christmas decorating but it was fun to experience a bit of pre-Christmas festivity.

The house where Handel was born,
now a museum
The ancient monastery where we found a Christmas market
Reindeer maybe?
One of the little huts at the Christmas fair
Each hut was decorated differently
We weren’t sure if it was a competition for the best decorations or just self expression!

A couple of hours drive out of Halle we arrived at the border of the Czech Republic. As soon as we crossed the border we saw snow! Great big piles of it by the roadside and all the trees were sparkling in the weak sunshine. It looked very Christmassy!

Driving out of Halle
The Halle water tower completed in 1899
We enter the Czech Republic
Great piles of snow!

We stopped to buy our motorway “vignette” just over the border and were hoping to fill up with water but the promised taps were switched off because of the extreme cold (to prevent burst pipes.)

Here’s where we bought the vignette

We weren’t too worried as we were still had enough left for that day and we were bound to find somewhere to fill up again in Prague where we were heading next.

The snow was sparkling on the trees

Alas! Absolutely all the camping places in and around Prague that we had picked as potential spots to spend the night were closed. We ended up parking near the Zoo car park (not actually in it as there was a police car parked in there).

We were underneath a steep hill with what looked like a lonely monastery on top and close by a very austere and creepy house was the only sign of habitation.

The lonely monastery on top of the
hill in Prague
Our only neighbour – an austere and creepy house!
We had a lovely walk along the banks of the Vltava River
There was quite a lot of snow in the ground!

The great thing about a van is you can pull all the blinds down and you could be anywhere! Once you sit down to a good meal in the cosy and warm atmosphere you can forget the world outside.

Once you pull the blinds down you could be anywhere in the world!

We drove through the outskirts of Prague the following morning and the impressive buildings we passed gave us a hint of what a glorious city it is. We will definitely be back!

The impressive buildings we went by gave us a hint of what a glorious city it is
More gracious buildings in Prague’s outskirts

We still hadn’t filled up with water. This was a worry as we were almost running out of the most essential of resources.

A very wintery view in the Czech Republic

Jonathan turned to the Internet to research for a solution. One of the very helpful websites for people travelling in a van mentioned a tap in a village just over the border in Austria.

A few hours later we were at a very small border crossing and were stopped by a very forlorn and extremely cold soldier who asked us our purpose for visiting Austria.

The small border crossing into Austria

Bearing in mind that Austria was in complete lockdown, we were a little anxious that we might get turned round but when we told him we were looking to fill up with water he waved us through with as much cheer as could be mustered when standing in the freezing cold!

We found the small village of Wolfsthal quite easily, we even found the tap but sadly it was switched off!

The good news is that we found the tap. The bad news was that it was not working!

Our only option was to keep going to the nearest town – Hainburg an der Donau and hope we could find water there.

As we drove towards the town we were interested to see a massive castle perched on top of the hill. The original was built in the 11th Century AD and it was destroyed in 1683 by the Ottomans but rebuilt in 1709. We wished we could go and look round it but of course it was closed.

On top of the hill we could see
the massive castle

Hainburg an der Donau was a lovely town with a 13th Century gate – the largest existing medieval gate in Europe. It also has a 2.5 km long town wall and a total of 15 towers!

The largest existing medieval gate in Europe
We could just squeeze through it!

The town also happened to have a small fuel station with a very friendly manager who kindly agreed to let us fill up with water much to our relief.

In the meantime, the local post office van nipped in front of us and blocked access to the tap. We had to wait for ages while the post woman sorted out the post she had collected at the garage.

Waiting for the post woman
to sort her mail collection.

By the time we had filled up it was getting quite dark and we set off in search of somewhere to stay the night.

By the time we had filled up with water it’s beginning to get dark!

First we headed for the nearby river, thinking there would be a car park or somewhere else suitable there.

We ended up travelling along a very narrow lane through a deserted area of farmland. It didn’t seem to promising so we headed for a sports centre – a good option that we have used in the past when we have had no luck finding somewhere to stop.

We ended up travelling along a very narrow lane which did not look promising

This one was by a pretty pond and was surrounded by fields so we had a very peaceful and quiet sleep before heading onwards towards Turkey.

Our parking spot at the sporting centre was next to a pretty pond

Anniversary celebrations and a pre-lockdown escape

This week we celebrated our 35th wedding anniversary on board our very comfortable Lagoon 420 catamaran in Finike Marina, Turkey.

“It was 35 years ago today ….”

Such a contrast to our tiny (28 foot) traditional cutter rig timber cruising yacht on which we spent our first wedding anniversary in 1987 in Ballina, New South Wales, Australia!

Our pride and joy having a day out with friends in Papua New Guinea

Although there wasn’t room to swing a cat in our little boat we loved it and had some great adventures in her in the Coral Sea, the highlight of which was an extended visit to Papua New Guinea.

In the intervening years we have had some wonderful anniversaries in fabulous places but it was particularly special to be celebrating our 35th on board once again.

Another anniversary – our 25th – in New York

Due to Covid lockdown restrictions we couldn’t go out to celebrate so we did the next best thing and ordered a lovely home delivery meal of fresh grilled fish, chips and salad (a loaf of bread came with it too!) – washed down by a very pleasant Turkish wine of course.

Our 35th celebration !

Talking of food, we have discovered that the fruit and vegetable shop we found on our first visit to Finike in August last year, not only delivers to the marina but also can buy herbs and other produce not normally found at the local market and shops.

This week he gave me a “menu” of goodies he could procure at the wholesale market in Marmaris and we ordered lots of fresh herbs, some fennel and “American” style capsicums, as well as some of the other “normal” fruit and vegetables.

All the “special” items our local fruit and veg man can obtain for us

We have been in Finike for over a month now and have been itching to get out and about and swing at anchor for a while. John and Sue on the catamaran Catabella felt the same way so we planned a short to trip to an idyllic little bay north of Finike called Çineviz Limani.

Here come the marina staff to help us with our lines

The day before our departure we heard that Turkey was going into a full lockdown for 17 days in an attempt to decrease the number of Covid cases before the summer season begins. This meant we had to go out for the whole lockdown or for only two days.

Sadly we had appointments and various bits of work scheduled in the following couple of weeks so we had to choose the two-day option.

Leaving the marina at Finike is very simple as one of the marina workers comes alongside in a dinghy to assist you and instruct you if necessary.

After helping us – on to S/V Catabella

As we slid through the water on our way out we passed S/V Catabella as Sue and John dropped their lines.

Letting go S/V Catabella’s lines

What a great feeling it was as we motored out of the marina! It was a sparking morning with scarcely a ripple to disturb the glassy surface of the water.

What a great feeling it was as we motored out of the marina
Farewell Finike!

We headed out as far as the fish farm just a short way off shore and then turned north for the four hour trip.

Going past the fish farm
Just behind us S/V Catabella skims through the water

Unfortunately the sail we were looking forward to didn’t eventuate as there was just no wind at all although about an hour before journey’s end we did roll out our foresail hoping to catch the few breaths that had begun to whisper across the water but had to give up and roll it back in fairly quickly.

There was scarcely a ripple to disturb the glassy surface of the water.
So calm we could see this turtle several metres away sunning itself

The coastline in this part of Turkey is rugged, wild and imposing and we enjoyed spotting the many caves in the limestone cliffs – lots of places for pirates to hide!

The coastline in this part of Turkey is quite wild and rugged.
There are loads of caves waiting to be explored!
Looks like there have been some rockfalls here!
There were people on the beach of this tiny little rocky island (spot the boat!)

As we approached Çavuş Burnu to start the approach to our anchorage – Çınevız Limanı we had spectacular views of Mt Olympos (Tahtalı Dağı).

A lovely clear view of Mt Olympos (Tahtalı Dağı) in the distance.

We were fortunate to have such a clear view of the whole mountain as apparently the peak is often covered by clouds, particularly in summer.

A closer view of Mt Olympos and still so clear

After we had settled John and Sue came over for gin and tonics and fish cooked on the barbecue. Lovely!

Buying the fish was quite the experience.
They were mostly very small so there wasn’t a huge choice
Sue and John arriving
Gin and tonics to start with

We couldn’t have been happier with our anchorage. Sunday and Catabella were the only yachts there, the sea was calm, there was no swell, the scenery was fabulous with awe inspiring cliffs dropping sheer into the sea. Bliss!